The best ways to invite grownups to participate on your PBIS team.

-by Timothy (Tim) Grivois, Ed.D. Note: I use “grownup” for “parents” because children have a variety of amazing adults in their lives, and all should be included in our PBIS implementation. Positive Behavior Interventions and Support functions best when grownups participate. Without grownups’ active involvement, teams can’t know if the systems, data, and practices meantContinue reading “The best ways to invite grownups to participate on your PBIS team.”

Strategies to support work completion habits for students with ADHD.

Particularly for schools with a Positive Behavior Interventions and Support framework, framing supports from a strengths-based perspective is essential. Below are some strategies that students with ADHD (and their families) often find supportive.

New resource: Individual Behavior Support Plan Template

Worksheet (45 minutes, maybe 90 minutes if there’s a lot to read) or a complete Functional Behavioral Analysis (weeks). Schools can use this template as part of their Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS), Response to Intervention (RTI), or Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) protocols to develop a behavioral support plan for youth.

New resource: Individual Student Drill Down Worksheet

This worksheet is modeled after Tier 1, 2, and 3 systems and practices common in schools implementing Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS). However, any school or youth-serving organization can use this template to frame issues needing support more effectively.

Support students with ADHD through play-based coaching.

Combined with in-the-moment feedback and support from families, schools can create exceptional learning environments for all students while offering students with ADHD effective and respectful support.

Classroom-possible, evidence-based supports for children with ADHD

One of the best researched and most effective interventions for ADHD is medication. However, medication is not an option for every child, and schools can’t require families to seek a diagnosis or a prescription. Since schools generally can’t control whether a family chooses medication as a treatment for ADHD, often the most effective, evidence-based supports for children with ADHD involve “classroom-possible” strategies that are good for all students, yet demonstrate the most benefit for students with ADHD.

  • Play-based skills coaching with peers
  • Recess at the beginning of the day, and ideally throughout instructional time
  • Positive reinforcement paired with clear, predictable expectations for behavior and classroom routines
  • Explicit training in organizational skills

No more triangles. No more tiers.

One of my clients is building a system for supporting students’ social, emotional, and academic achievement for the first time. Another is revising their approach to ensure that they are aware of their students’ social, emotional, and academic needs and has already created a system for supporting anything that might prevent student learning. Often, people call this “response to intervention” or “RTI.” Both are accomplishing this work with no triangles, and no tiers.

Youth: The missing voice in Check-in, Check-out.

One of the problems with CICO is that it works. What if the only reason student behavior improves is because we’ve provided frequent doses of external motivation, and never connect the goals we have for students to goals that they have for themselves?

Emotional regulation & co-regulation to support trauma informed practices

Trauma Informed Care, skills and practices, will be more important than ever upon return to classrooms this fall. During this workshop teachers/staff will reflect upon the emotional toll of the past year as well as identify emotional triggers, learn emotional regulation skills, and understand the importance of co-regulation between student and teacher.

How to keep those you serve at the center of your work.

The most important member of any team designing any intervention or service will always be the person the plan is supposed to benefit. Instead of assuming to know how best to help someone, find out sure.