Rethinking Positive Feedback in PBIS

Positive Behavior Interventions and Support centralizes positive feedback as a critical tenet of school-wide social and emotional support. Both the data and my values as a caring professional lead me to support expanding the frequency of kind words on campus. However, we must be mindful to avoid common mindsets that might lead to adverse outcomes. Whatever your system for positive feedback, make sure that the goal is warm, supportive relationships.

Don’t just look at data. Use it.

The best part of using data in this way is that you don’t need a Professional Learning Community structure. In fact, a PLC format might get in the way of the work by making things take longer. Instead, the most important task is to measure what matters, communicate data to your team, and take action that serves students and teachers effectively.

Strategies to support work completion habits for students with ADHD.

Particularly for schools with a Positive Behavior Interventions and Support framework, framing supports from a strengths-based perspective is essential. Below are some strategies that students with ADHD (and their families) often find supportive.

Listen to youth. Improve outcomes.

In this case, the youth has committed to a shared goal of increasing organization. As school adults, we have the power to support them in achieving their goal, or to prevent them from growing by insisting on strategies we have already tried and the student rejects. Instead, I hope that our team listens to what the youth has said, and that we show up for them in the way they have asked us to.

New resource: Individual Behavior Support Plan Template

Worksheet (45 minutes, maybe 90 minutes if there’s a lot to read) or a complete Functional Behavioral Analysis (weeks). Schools can use this template as part of their Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS), Response to Intervention (RTI), or Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) protocols to develop a behavioral support plan for youth.

New resource: Individual Student Drill Down Worksheet

This worksheet is modeled after Tier 1, 2, and 3 systems and practices common in schools implementing Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS). However, any school or youth-serving organization can use this template to frame issues needing support more effectively.

Youth: The missing voice in Check-in, Check-out.

One of the problems with CICO is that it works. What if the only reason student behavior improves is because we’ve provided frequent doses of external motivation, and never connect the goals we have for students to goals that they have for themselves?

Why Social and Emotional Learning has nothing to do with how students behave.

Social and emotional learning makes sense. Knowing who we are, understanding how our emotions function, and being able to establish and maintain healthy interactions with people supports social, emotional, and academic success as well as improves the quality of life for our students in the future. We can support SEL best by emphasizing the learning and deemphasizing behavior.

Emotional regulation & co-regulation to support trauma informed practices

Trauma Informed Care, skills and practices, will be more important than ever upon return to classrooms this fall. During this workshop teachers/staff will reflect upon the emotional toll of the past year as well as identify emotional triggers, learn emotional regulation skills, and understand the importance of co-regulation between student and teacher.

Support youth in becoming who they want to be, not how we want them to behave.

by Timothy (Tim) Grivois-Shah, Ed.D. The most successful behavioral supports in schools typically involve 1) frequent doses of positive feedback & prompting, and 2) strong relationships with a trusted mentor. Check-in, Check-out (CICO) is a common framework for behavioral support, and when it works, students of any age know that someone they respect both wantsContinue reading “Support youth in becoming who they want to be, not how we want them to behave.”