Self-care action plan

-by Tim Grivois, Ed.D. I recently led a workshop on self-care for an amazing group of caring professionals from Youth on Their Own, YOTO. While feedback from the workshop was positive, participants did ask for more time to work with three specific activities that accompany the Eight Dimensions of Wellness Cards. Below are the activitiesContinue reading Self-care action plan

Why Social and Emotional Learning has nothing to do with how students behave.

Social and emotional learning makes sense. Knowing who we are, understanding how our emotions function, and being able to establish and maintain healthy interactions with people supports social, emotional, and academic success as well as improves the quality of life for our students in the future. We can support SEL best by emphasizing the learning and deemphasizing behavior.

Emotional regulation & co-regulation to support trauma informed practices

Trauma Informed Care, skills and practices, will be more important than ever upon return to classrooms this fall. During this workshop teachers/staff will reflect upon the emotional toll of the past year as well as identify emotional triggers, learn emotional regulation skills, and understand the importance of co-regulation between student and teacher.

How your organization can practice self-care.

Ultimately, the work of self-care happens individually from the inside out. However, caring professionals are more likely to have time and space to attend to their own self care when they work in organizations fluent in the Eight Dimensions of Wellness.

Protect your regulated space.

Helping children and youth regulate emotions begins with establishing, protecting, and expanding our own regulated space. This kind of self-care is more than just treating ourselves to something or eating more vegetables. Rather, it’s about being intentional about our own health and wellness so that we can be available to serve others at our best.

Visibly dismantle racism. Do it now.

Yes, form a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee. Of course, lead book studies and share articles. Develop surveys and such. These are all long-term strategies that might possibly support antiracism work in your workspace. Just know that they are insufficient.

More than the hurt.

In my professional life, I’ve made a commitment to support a trauma-informed approach to care when no such approach currently exists. Now, however, it is time to elevate our understanding of what a healing-centered approach might mean for those we serve and for us as caring professionals.

Emotional Self-Care: Trusting the Self

Emotional self-care is grounded in trusting myself as I navigate a daily barrage of unsupported opinions, biases, and prejudices that deny the truth of how I walk through life. Trusting my instincts is a struggle when the stories all around me become louder and more dominant that the story of my being. Immersion in the communities that affirm my experiences and understandings support me in ways that would be impossible in any other form.